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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 6, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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recep.. ♪ a double play ends the game and sends the orioles to the next round. and a ground ball to third. flaherty, second base. the turn. in time. the baltimore orioles sweep the tigers. the o's -- >> next stop, baltimore.
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the royals will play in the american league championship series. all right. mika, your dance worked. >> it did. >> this is my daughter's team. >> the orioles. >> she goes to hopkins. it's baltimore. >> that's the royals. >> oh. >> the orioles. but your dance -- but willie geist, the kansas city royals, they are an extraordinary story. >> unbelievable. >> and the fact that they swept the angels is just kind of mind blowing. >> angels had the best record in baseball this year, dominated their division, dominated the american league. the royals had to fight in, won a one-game playoff in extra innings to get in and sweep the best team in baseball, perhaps, in los angeles and move on. how cool is this alcs. feels like it's 1985 when you have the orioles and royals, going to be playing in baltimore on friday. >> i'm going to baltimore friday. >> the game there is.
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>> thomas. >> i usually hate him for giving the cookies. >> hate him for a lot of reasons. you're just a hater. >> but i'm so excited. the dance worked. >> the dance -- >> what's the dance. >> would you like to recreate the dance. >> only when thomas starts singing "magic magic magic." it's a very dance. >> worst dancer i've seen in my life. >> my teenagers will never be the same. >> it worked. >> the tigers getting swept. i hated to see that. we have a' -- put that back up there. so we've got a -- quite a lineup. >> oh, yes. >> so the nationals, willie, a lot of weeping and nashing of teeth in washington, d.c., sunday morning, over the longest game in playoff history. >> 16 innings was it or 18 innings? >> 18 innings. >> six hours and change. they're in trouble now. they have to go to san francisco and play there. >> they're in big trouble. looks like the series to be watching right now is going to be the dodgers and the
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cardinals. >> it's monday, october 6th. a lot to talk about beyond baseball. political right nick confessore with us. and we will start on the set with the ebola outbreak and just a few hours, another american who tested positive for ebola will arrive at nebraska medical center in omaha. ashoka mukpo the nbc free lance cameraman working with dr. nancy snyderman in africa will be treated by dozens of specialist. the fifth american to be diagnosed with the virus. in dallas the man who the cdc says slipped by screeners into the u.s. is fighting for his life. eric thomas duncan is in critical condition and family members say he is on a respirator. reporters on the ground following both caseses. john yang live at the nebraska medical center and mark potter outside the texas health presbyterian hospital. we'll start with john, ashoka mukpo is set to arrive today. what can you tell us about how the hospital is getting ready
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and what his condition is? >> they are ready, mika. there is is a biocontainment unit, one of the biggest isolation unit in america, ten beds awaiting him, about 40 medical personnel will be treating him. he's on his final leg here after a brief stop in bangor, maine, to repul and go through the formality of u.s. customs. once he lands at omaha, he will land at the main airport here, eply field. the plane will taxi off to a remote part of the airport. he'll be loaded into an ambulance for the quick 15-minute drive here. this is a part of the airport where he'll encounter no public. it's not a part of the airport where the general public would be. he'll be wearing a protective suit covered head to toe. no part of his body exposed so that he'll be completely covered and then once he gets here they will be evaluating him here at the hospital in the
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biocontainment unit. about 40 medical personnel, people actually volunteering to treat him for ebolap. mika? >> all right. thanks very much for that. we'll get to mark potter in a minute for the apparently worsening condition of the other patient. meanwhile the outbreak in africa is getting worse by the day. according to the latest statistics by the world health organization the death toll stands at over 3400 with over 7,000 recorded cases, but the actual number is likely to be worse. the country of sierra leone had its worst day since the outbreak began, recording 121 deaths in a single day. and the growing crisis is bringing attention to the initial response by the international community. a top official at the world health organization tells "the washington post" the group may have waited too long to respond to the outbreak. it took the who 4.5 months to declare a global health emergency and by that time it was too late. joining us from london, professor of infectious disease
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at the london school of hygiene and tropical med crin dr. david heymann, who is a former world health organization official who investigated the first ebola outbreak back in 1976. it's good to have you this morning. >> dr. hayman, obviously a blistering report in "the washington post" yesterday about a lot of missed signals starting last spring, a moment at the end of july where the head of doctors without borders was begging the world health organization to step up and declare this an international emergency. and she was called overly pessimist pessimistic. why so many missed signals in this outbreak? >> it's really not clear why this outbreak wasn't dealt with earlier, but it's also clear that if it is dealt with in a rural area where there's better community organization, village chiefs, village elders, they can help with the response. it got out of a rural area, unlike the 25 previous outbreaks that were stopped in rural areas, and now it's in an urban
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area. >> so what can -- what should the united states be doing? what should the world community be doing right now to slow the rapid spread of this disease down in west africa? >> and are they doing it? >> most important is the three principles that have stopped outbreaks in the past. that's finding an and a isolating patients and when they're isolated health workers don't get infected. tracing contacts with those that have been in contact with the patient. checking their temperature twice daily for three weeks. if they get sick, diagnosing if it's ebola, putting them in the hospital. the third is making sure that the community understands how to prevent infection and that there are ways to bury dead bodies and take care of those that are sick. this is what's required. >> i guess i want to know what your concern level is about whether or not that can happen in africa and as it per tape ta
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the u.s. we've been hearing medical officials say there's a certain drug to treat ebola and it's very limited in supply and i'm confused as to how we can be so sure it can be contained and that we have the ability and that everything is going to be okay if there aren't enough drugs to treat it? >> well, there certainly aren't any drugs to treat it. that's clear. the outbreak must be stopped by the traditional means that we just spoke about. isolating patients, tracing contacts, making sure that people with fever are diagnosed and community understanding. very, very difficult in urban areas in africa. but there are some hopes. there are some remedies that could be tried which might be sustainable. for example, the blood of people who have survived from ebola contains antibodies. if those antibodies can be collected and provided to patients who are still sick, it may be that it can decrease the virus in their blood and
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actually make them better. hopefully that's what will happen and these are some of the things that need to be studied. anti-viral drugs are present, but they're not in such a supply that they could be tried at present. >> dr. david heymann, thank you very much. a couple unanswered questions about how it's being dealt with here in the u.s. that don't add up in terms of the drugs there are to treat it and how people are getting it. >> we had a fascinating discussion yesterday on "meet the press." >> i saw that. fantastic. you had david axelrod and gen eiffel on the side of -- i'm sorry, i'll say it, they're like the cop in the simpsons. who's the cop? >> come on. david will be here. >> chief wigham. >> pretty good. >> things will be blowing up. everything is flooding. he goes, nothing to see here. >> that is not. >> but there are so many unanswered questions. >> yeah. >> you had yesterday, david
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jumped me because i simply quoted the doctor that got ebola and came back to the united states who talked about what a horrible situation it was and right now you've got the government saying don't worry about it. nothing to -- don't panic. if you ask any tough questions, suddenly you're panicking. chuck todd brought up a great point yesterday, you look at all the scandals over the past 18 months, willie, whens the government says don't worry about it, we have it taken care of. forget about barack obama, go back to impeachment, the 2000, iraq, abu ghraib, the housing bubble generated by government policy, the irs, va, nsa wire tapping, james rosen, the federal government telling us to not ask tough questions and not to worry about it is a problem. if you read "the washington
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post," it is very clear they've been downplaying this from the very beginning. i don't think americans are going to sit back and go, it's cool. the government's got it taken care of. i don't believe the government has it taken care of. why trust the government on something this important? i think they have to prove to us they have it taken care of. >> the problem is they may be right in this case there's nothing to panic about but because of all the things you've listed over the two decades or so people don't instinctively trust what they hear from the government anymore. i think it's true that united states is different from west africa. i think we have better implements in place to help contain this. as you say no one is going to take anything at face value. it's smart not to panic right now because listen, the way we handle things is very different from the way they're capable of handling things in west africa. >> do we, by raising questions, this is what bothered me yesterday, simply raising the questions that "the washington post" raised, about how the world health organization last
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spring said this is small, don't worry about it. this is small, and then the head of the world health organization, when this had already exploded, had the head of doctors without borders coming saying pay more attention of this. >> the white house -- this is the one thing, i will tell you, you can't argue, they were completely on top of and sent assistance to africa because they saw it coming. >> they're talking about it. the only problem is, though -- >> they acted too. >> nick, from all reports, the response right now, is too slow. we were talking about boots on the ground but it's -- >> the same people, same governments that were saying about the africa crisis, don't worry about it, it's going to be fine, right, and they were wrong then. >> right. >> are the same ones saying about the u.s. version, don't worry, it's going to be pine. as you were saying, willie, we have a huge public health infrastructure here. >> by the way, can we add the world health organization and united nations all government
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entities have failed us thus far. why should we be confident -- they've underestimated this. why should we sit back and go, it's cool. we need to be asking tough questions. >> no question about that. right now in the u.s. you have a greater chance of being shot in the head than getting this ri sflus ebola. >> there's some element of like do you want to create a panic, do you want people, you know, if they see someone sneezing in their office running home and going crazy. >> no, but we want to deal with flights coming in. >> that is important. >> by the way, most americans don't understand, i know all the smart guys, the smart women understand, why we continue to allow flights coming from west africa. i can tell you, i'm a regular guy. i'm a simply country lawyer, willie. you've seen me in court. you know. >> very good. >> the whole bit. most of us simple folk, we don't understand why you keep letting flights come into the united states unabated. they go, oh, it will stop the
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relief efforts. really? is there not a better way to make sure we can screen to make sure flights going over to west africa with relief workers are able to come back? i want us to declare war on ebola. i really do. i'm not saying here like a lot of stooges that i've been reading, it's their problem. no. it's our problem. it's the world's problem. i don't understand why we can't take a tougher line on people flying into this country. >> well, i think one of the other health stories that we're going to get to in morning papers is on ep ter row virus 68, a child that died over the weekend? in new jersey. >> this story is creeping in under the radar compared to ebola. >> he went to sleep with -- mi a mika, he went to sleep without any symptoms at all. >> we will talk about that coming up. still ahead on "morning joe," a nation under medical alert. not just ebola as i mentioned, the dangerous enterovirus has
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claimed its first death. a 4-year-old boy as the flu season is about to get under way. the head of the cdc on how prepared the u.s. is to handle these emergencies. a man tries to run, yes, run, around the bermuda triangle in a bubble. >> it's inflatable. >> okay. >> the trip didn't go as he planned. you're watching "morning joe." >> what did he plan? i mean -- >> wait. >> what was he thinking was going to happen? it's monday, a brand new start. with centurylink visionary cloud infrastructure, and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable, secure, and agile. when folks think about wthey think salmon and energy. but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology.
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all right. time to take a look at the morning papers. "the new jersey star ledger." the cdc has confirmed a 4-year-old preschooler from new jersey is the first child to die after contracting the d-68 strain of enterovirus. eli waller's parents say other than having pink eye, their son appeared to be in good health before he passed away. eli was the youngest of three
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triplets leaving behind two sisters. his father describes him as, quote, as a shy puppy who was full of love. the cdc says as of friday there are 543 reported cases of enterovirus d-68 as cross 43 states. >> eli went to sleep, perfectly fine. and didn't wake up from this virus. this, as we've been talking about it some time, everybody talking about ebola, this is certainly frightening. >> we've got the head of the cdc coming on. we have a lot of questions for him about this as well as the ebola spread. "the san francisco chronicle" one of silicon valley's largest companies will split into two. hewlett-packard will reportedly divide its computer and printer business from its corporate hardware business. the company is trying to stay relevant as the pc market continues to change. hp currently has more than 300,000 employees. it's on track to hit $112 billion in revenue this year. >> "the san diego union tribune"
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california voters will decide how to scale back prison population in the face of rising population and costs. a new measure would transform multpy nonviolent crimes punishable by brief jail time rather than long stays in a state prison. the measure entitled proposition 47 would apply retroactively lowering the penalties for thousands serving time. voters will decide on the measure on november 4th. >> willie, i think you're going to see this in one state after another, states, voters will look at criminalization of not just marijuana but other substances. >> yeah. >> and possession itself of drugs that 20 years ago would have put you in jail for 20 years, i just think their xway' going to say come on, enough is enough. if people want to do that to themselves let them but why should we pay for prison for 20 years. >> look at the overcrowding and some of the sentences, if you are found and pulled over in
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your car in some states with marijuana you can go to jail for five or six years. i don't think most common people or people of good sense think that's a good idea for anybody. >> it's insanity. >> the dale mail, japanese zoo knows why its attempt to get two high yeen nas to mate were males. >> this happened to me in high school and i couldn't figure it out. >> what are you talking about? >> i thought i was baaed. >> hamsters. >> high yeen nis. >> no. >> they were high yeen nas in the backyard in a cage. >> they were married. >> it was my -- it was my science experiment for ninth, tenth, 11th and 12th grade. >> flunked out of high school. >> yeah. >> zoo officials say they were told the pair were of opposite sex when they acquired the animals from a zoo in south korea. >> they couldn't check that out for four years. >> can't they look? >> the pair --
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>> slipped under. >> this prompted the zoo to conduct tests to determine the animals' genders. >> why do you have to conduct tests? >> lift the legs up and could see. >> wow. okay. >> oh. dan just told me. >> what? >> he just told me. >> it's fairly hard to tell it. >> it's hard to tell on high yeen nas. let's go to the miami herald the coast guard rescued a man trying to make his way to bermuda, i tried this in high school too! in an inflatable bubble. the 42-year-old was hoping to outline the bermuda to triangle back to miami in a bubble called hydro pod. you are -- you know what -- >> what's going on today. >> this guy deserveded to have the hydro pod pop and drown. has a metal frame and allows the user to run. >> hamster wheel. >> similar to a hamster wheel. officials say he activated his located beacon off the coast of
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florida after becoming disoriented due to extreme fatigue. >> come on, man. >> come on, dude! come on. you should have figured that out on south beach. >> imagine the planning meeting for that one. that's what i'm thinking about. hamster wheel through the bermuda triangle. >> i'm just going to run. >> you guys are like a bunch of high yeen nas. okay. coming up, we have a lot of news to cover. >> find out what kind of high yeen na we are. >> exactly. >> a lot of news to cover as the ebola patient in dallas is fighting for his life. what precautionings are in place to prevent a larger outbreak? the cdc's director joins us next. then after ben affleck goes after bill maher for his alleged gross and racist views, this was explosive. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts?
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♪ we have been sold this mean of islamophobia where every criticism of the doctrine of islam gets conflated with
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bigotry towards muslims as people. >> right. >> that is intellectually -- >> hold on. are you the person who understands the officially codified doctrine of islam? you're the interpreter so you can say -- >> i'm well educated. if i criticize -- islamophobia is not a real thing. >> i'm not denying certain are big gotted against muslims as people. >> that's big of you. >> why are you hostile about this concept? >> it's gross and racist. >> it's not. >> we have to be able to criticize bad ideas. >> of course we do. >> but this moment is the mother load of bad ideas. >> jesus. that's just a fact. >> it's not a fact. >> it's an ugly thing. >> you don't understand americans. >> you know, black people, you know, they show up -- >> no, it's not. it's based on facts. i can show you a pew poll of egyptians they are to the outliars in the muslim world that say like 90% believe death is the appropriate response to
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leaving religion. if 90% of brazilians thought death was the appropriate response to leaving catholicism you would think it's a bigger deal. >> i'm sorry, where's ben affleck been for the bast 13, 14 years? where has he been? >> well -- >> i think this is -- i think this is a problem. the suggestion there's not a problem with radical islam not only, you know, across the world but here and then to somehow go to the other side and say you're attacking all muslims is just absolute insanity. if only there were somebody here that could speak eloquent lly o the subject that understood the culture. jen, are you -- can you -- are you in us limb? did you grow up in a muslim country? you're jewish. look. i should have known you were jewish. >> you should have.
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>> i should have known. of course you're jewish. what's up? how are you doing? >> i was taken back by this discussion. first of all, it's a bit on the surface, five non-muslims talking about problems in the muslim world is interesting and iss issues pertaining to a muslim woman and not have any muslim women -- >> when crazy right wing christians blow up abortion clinics a lot of people don't have any problem talking about that. >> no. but here's the issue and the point you made. what is ben affleck doing. this is not in defense but more importantly, what is that conversation really about? he said islam is the mother load of bad ideas. this isn't an issue about societal problems. >> you're talking about bill maher? >> no. about the guest that was to his right. >> who was that? sam harris. >> one of the raging atheists. say that about christians.
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>> the issue not about the ril. my problem with the debate, this is the danger of what's taking place when there's a discussion about muslims, issues in the muslim world. is that there are societal problems and they are in predominantly muslim countries. that is not a problem with their religion. that is a problem with governance and issues. that's like me saying there's a poverty problem in the u.s. which is a predominantly christian country, a poverty problem in venezuela, which is a christian country therefore not able to deal with poverty. >> what we need to do, stop people from eating. because if they eat, then we're all going to hell. >> no. but the issue is this, this is my problem, again, they're conflating the issue of religion and how people interpret and practice their religion. >> exactly. >> there's no problem in having a discussion about radical islam, where that comes from. but to suddenly use that to say islam is a religion is the
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mother load of bad ideas i think that's -- >> that is -- >> that's disappointing. >> that's offensive. >> it is. it's beyond offensive. you would not talk about any other religion in the united states in that same kind of -- >> but they do. that's the thing. for ben affleck to sit there and go oh, my god, my hair is on fire, has -- every time i go on bill maher's show, and i've been on probably 15, 20 times over the past couple decades, he's obsessed. he hates the fact that i believe in god. he hates the fact that anybody believes in any god. and i'm cool with him being an atheist. that's okay. but it is one insult after another and if that was sam harris on, i've read stuff, they do that to everybody. i know what he said about islamophobia but he would have said the same thing about evangelicals. there is a problem with radical islam. a huge problem. people that distort and twist the teachings. >> i think there's a fund mental problem with extremism.
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it is important to have a debate as to why extremism exists, where it comes from, why this problem is prevalent. i have a major problem with people like bill maher and those trying to say it is because of their religion and not because of the way people are interpreting and applying their religion. these are societies and when we talk about the muslim world it's a vast area, different problems. i mean you can't just say the muslim world and reference indonesia and algeria and turkey and bosnia. >> but let me ask you this, just let me push a little further to make people uncomfortable, what's a greater threat to civilization, christian extremism, jewish extreechlism or muslim extremism. >> to civilization. >> yes. >> around the world? >> rit large. >> good luck answering that question. >> how much time do we have? >> i mean look -- >> joking aside, you're looking at a very specific time in the history of humanity. what about when the crusades were taking place invading the world -- >> i'm talking about 2014.
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i'm not talking about -- >> great. >> about over the past 1500 years. because, obviously, you know and most educated people know that the muslim world was responsible for great advances that we still are benefiting from today. the western civilization built the renaissance. we understand that. 2014, what's the gravest threat to civilization right now? >> i would not say any of those. not say radical islam is the greatest threat to civilization today. >> global warming. >> says mant from "the new york times." >> i have got to -- >> listen, it's hard to say that isis presents an existential threat to the united states. is our country going to fall because of radical islam, because of isis? i don't think so. doesn't mean we shouldn't go after them. >> right. >> they aren't coming to our borders and taking over washington. >> so -- >> when you say existential threat, can our society survive it? i don't know. >> okay. >> as fascinating as this is, i have to get to the director of the cdc about major headlines. we have. can i interrupt?
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>> i guess so. ayman just wouldn't stop. he kept attacking baptists and i had to defend them. >> it's a fascinating conversation. >> some of my best friends are baptists. >> the centers for disease control and prevention, dr. tom frieden. doctor, i saw you where on "meet the press" and want to follow up to something you said about medicine to treat ebola being in very short supply, being very hard to make, taking a long time to make. if that is the case, how can we be sure that we really have our handle on the situation here in the u.s. if it were to come in larger numbers? >> that's a great question. in fact, the way we're going to stop ebola is not only by caring for individuals, but most importantly, by making sure we track every single contact, make sure as texas has done, that they have tracked every single day and none of them there have had fever or symptoms, if any do to isolate them. that's how you break the chain of transmission. because of our public health and health care systems in this
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country, that i'm confident we're not going to have a large outbreak here. >> that's just completely avoiding or overlooking what happened in texas where the system broke down? >> in texas there were exposures. those exposures, some of them were preventable, and that's unfortunate. we're doing a lot to ensure that hospitals, emergency departments, doctors, nurses, throughout the country really keep this top of mind as they should. >> doctor, the cdc has done a great job over the past six months. during this crisis understanding the severity of this crisis. you can't say the same thing about the world health organization. you guys got stiff armed by the w.h.o. why did it take them so long to get it? to figure out that this was an f international crisis. >> the world needs the world health organization and what we've done at cdc is help them get stronger. we're all going to learn from this and look back. this was a first ever situation, unprecedented. what's happening now is actually
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we're seeing signs of hope. we're seeing signs of progress in africa. >> i'm sorry. you say the first ever, what do you mean the first ever? this is important. how is this ebola different from past ebola outbreaks? >> it's the first epidemic of ebola we've ever had. it's crossing multiple countries in west africa, it's had larger numbers than ever before, it's in urban areas. >> why is that? >> because it was let to spread for too long. >> too long. yep. >> got into places it shouldn't have and then once there, it became very difficult to control when you didn't have enough places to place people to care for people. >> willie? >> dr. frieden, let me ask you about something else that has people concerned this morning, the enterovirus d-68. we learned over the weekend a little boy, a 4-year-old named eli, from new jersey, one of three triplets, died from this. went to bed, his mother said, with no symptoms except maybe a little pink eye and never woke up. for people watching, for people with children this morning, i know it's in 43 states and washington, d.c., what should they know about this?
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>> yeah. bottom line is, it's a new situation. we haven't seen this kind of widespread transmission. it does tend to fade as the fall goes on. and what tends to happen next is flu season. it's time to get a flu shot. make sure you wash your hands. don't go out if you're sick. cover your cough. and if your child has asthma, make sure their asthma is well controlled because that's what we've seen in some of the more severe illnesses here. >> but dr. frieden, how could a 4-year-old boy go to bed with pink eye and not wake up? what is this virus? >> i can't comment on that individual case. what i can tell you is we've seen quite a wide variety of symptoms from mild to severe. for those with severe disease, most of them have been children who have had asthma or other respiratory problems that have been made worse by this infection. >> dr. tom frieden, we appreciate you coming. busy time but we appreciate you being here. >> thank you very much. >> god that is so frightening. it's really so frightening that
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the kid goes to sleep, the 4-year-old goes to sleep. >> yeah. >> no symptoms. >> but we're talking a about almost all 50 state, at least in the 40s, having children who have been severely brought down by this, whether they're suffering from even partial paralysis and terrible symptoms, it's frightening and i -- >> it is horrible. >> sort of balancing the fact that we obviously need to cover this world -- international story of ebola, but there is this other health issue that i'm not sure we're giving enough attention to but we will have now on. still ahead, do republicans need to take the senate in order to call this year's election a victory? >> some polls out right now suggesting that republicans, pathway to the majority is getting a lot more complicated. >> much more "morning joe" straight ahead.
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turning to domestic politics and new polling in three key senate races this fall. according to a new nbc news marist poll in kansas, independent greg orman leads senator pat roberts 48% -- >> nick, you're shaking your head. nobody would have -- let's keep that up for a while. nobody would have seen this coming. >> 48 to 38. >> it's mind blowing pat roberts is losing by ten points. >> yeah. >> by the way, you think that i next to greg orman's name may inspire people two years from now to do the same thing. >> especially in the led states. >> yeah. >> if you're a nonconservative running in a big red state like kansas which has no elected --
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>> yeah. >> state wide years and years. why do it. go as an independent and say i'm not sure who i'm going to caucus with. if you're on the right side come november join which ever party is in the majority. >> likely half voters said they had an unfavorable impression of the senator. north carolina, incumbent kay hagan leads republican state house speaker tom tills is. >> that one too. you get the sense there. >> it's close. >> it's close and you know what, this could all switch. this could be a wave election in the last two weeks, explode in the republicans favor. i don't see it. i see too many cross currents a and in this case kay haggen still holding on up by four. >> she is a survivor. >> the amount of outside spending in that race, but all spending in that race is astonishing and they've been hitting her from the right for like ten months. >> yeah. >> on and on and yet stubbornly there is this core of voters who have been like, okay, she's our
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person. they just haven't abandoned her. now 44 ls 444/40 is not -- >> it could all switch tomorrow and that's what people need to understand. >> but it's interesting. >> with the majority -- >> she hangs on. >> we're getting to a point now where we -- i remember when you go on certain websites, mitt romney up by 11 points and then see media polls that showed obama up by 4 in ohio and just stayed there. at some point about three weeks out i started saying, you know, yeah. >> let me get to iowa real quick. >> we're getting there now where the polls matter. >> the race to replace tom harken. joanie earnings leads bruce braley. within the poll's margin of err error. >> willie, a race where the democrat has just made one
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mistake after another but he's still within the margin of error. >> hanging in. >> this is a statep areps have to win. not for '14 but going into '16 to prove they can win in something other than dark red states. >> that election is a coin toss right now. and we're talking about this republican wave that we keep hearing about. those three races go the other way forget about a republican wave. interesting in all threes races we just showed president obama's approval rating is in the 30s. perhaps he's not the albatross for all these candidates that he's supposed to be because the republicans are attacking democrats as being tools of the obama administration and they're all hanging in in those states. >> coming up from the secret service blunders to the va in disarray, should we trust the obama administration to handle the ebola virus? we're going to debate that ahead. plus, vice president biden says something that has our middle east allies up in arms. we're going to tell you what that was. >> what? he's on an apology tour.
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you have everybody saying let's stay calm. that's what the world health organization said back in the
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spring when this broke out. and then they said, let's stay calm when the head of doctors without borders, as "the washington post" reported went to them in late july and said this is a crisis. they said, you're panicking. you're panicking. kent brantley, a guy that knows something about this, because he had it, said this is a fire from hell and if you think the atlantic ocean is going to stop it from coming over here you're kidding yourself. >> i don't want to agree with dr. scarborough, but i have -- >> no, i understand. >> but brantley -- >> here's the point. >> these are public health professionals of world-class standing. they have no motivation to mislead the american people. they've dealt with many epide c epidemics before, many health issues before. i don't think there's a reason to believe they're not doing what needs to be done. >> i'll be honest with you, this is a serious issue. i'm quoting people that have ebola that have spent time in west africa -- >> people like you and like us, go on television, and say, this is far worse than they're
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saying. >> i'm not saying that. >> this is a reason to be -- >> guys. >> then people respond to it. >> i'm going to hit -- >> what i was saying we need to ask tough questions. >> we do have to ask tough questions even toe david doesn't want tough questions ever to be asked. he wants to say snothsty thingses. >> i don't know how you got through those years in politics being so sensitive. >> i expect cheap shots from people in politics. i don't expect -- >> it's not a cheap shot. >> i don't expect them from my friends. david don't -- i have to ask a question before you start talking. >> here's my concern -- >> you had the head of the cdc -- >> david, i have to ask a question. the head of the cdc on. >> i heard. >> why this is a problem. he said it's a problem because officials didn't ask on it fast enough. the world health organization missed every red light. we have to ask tough questions. i was quoting "the washington post" article yesterday and you
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come back with snide remark. maybe you should read the article and take the screwups seriously. >> i read the article, take them seriously, i understand the world was slow in response. the question on the table, should the american people be panicked. >> no, they shouldn't. we agree with that. >> >> that's fine. but the -- look, i watched, because i'm an invet rant watcher of "morning joe," i watched you on friday you said they weren't being straightforward how you can contract this, you said people are told not to panic, but the cdc isn't being straight. now, the fact is, these guys have no other mission in life but to keep people safe. i think tom frieden is a straight up professional and excellent public health official. tony fauci, the medal of freedom -- >> they're great. i agree. >> from the bush administration. they're trying to solve this problem. >> i agree. >> i don't want people to panic and i don't think we should provoke them to panic either. that's different than asking
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tough questions. >> let me bring in matt lewis. every time you ask a tough question people like david axelrod says you're trying to make americans panic, when actually what we're trying to do is ask tough questions about how did the w.h.o. screw this up, why is it the doctor, dr. kent brantley, that treated ebola patients, still doesn't know how he got ebola, why -- i mean, it's okay for the cdc, it's okay for the w.h.o. to say this is something a little bit different. we really don't have all the answers right now. but let's work together. it's just like if you ask a tough question, suddenly you're trying to make the world panic. >> i think the problem is, that this has to go in context, right. it's not just ebola. it's a whole slew of issues that we've been told, don't worry about. i actually have a question for david, which is, you know, whether it's isis being called the jv, whether it's the irs scandal being dismissed as a phony scandal, it seems like the obama administration has had a strategic -- made a strategic
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decision to sort of go with ensues yants, no drama obama, whatever crisis is facing them, the first instinct is to downplay it, dismiss it as not a big deal. i worry there's a boy who cried wolf phenomena taking place right now, where people frankly have quit believing them. >> well, i don't think there's a boy who cried wolf phenomena going on right now. the united states is leading the effort, the global effort, on the ebola problem. we've got 3,000 troops there with maybe more on the way. 120 cdc people there. we're leading the effort. we helped nigeria stop ebola in its tracks by bringing the right public health techniques to them. >> but -- >> so i don't think there's a boy who cried wolf. >> joe, you're shifting goal posts. you said on the air that people shouldn't trust the cdc when they tell you how you can get ebola and the cdc is trying to calm the american people and
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make them understand how ebola is contracted. that's quite different than asking tough questions. those are objective facts. if you ask kent brantley he would probably say the same thing. >> first of all, kent brantley still doesn't know how he got ebola. secondly, i've said this morning the cdc is doing a great job. the question is, though, you know, if all you're going to do is run around and say oh, not much to see here, much -- not much to do about anything. >> that's more i was getting at. >> i have to say also -- >> nobody is saying that. don't -- >> that's all you guys always say. >> don't put words in my mouth. >> david, you have been telling me that for five, six, seven years. every time a problem comes up, you go, oh, come on, joe. nothing to worry about here. this isn't about politics. this is about public safety. matt lewis on that front and then give david the last word. i count on you being the reasonable conservative. right wingers are saying why are we in africa, why do we have
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troops over there? why are we engaged? this is not our problem. do you agree with me, this is our problem? and we need to aggressively do what we can as a nation to lead as david axelrod is saying? >> absolutely. look, i think we're all united on that. i'm saying when it comes to leadership, i think it's very important that we take things seriously, because we need the public to buy in and believe us. but in the case of ebola, absolutely i'm with you on that. >> david, i'm going to give you a chance to attack me viciously at the top of the hour with more cheap shots when we return. we're out of time. but i will seriously, my friend, give you a chance to call me doctor again. thank you so much. matt, thank you. we'll see you later. we appreciate. david see you in a minute. coming up how did the world health organization drop the ball on ebola? the one thing that may stop hillary clinton from a return to the white house. all the and much more, nothing but love around here on "morning joe." ch ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7 it's just i'm a little reluctant to try new things.
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welcome back to "morning joe." david axelrod still with us. ayman mohyeldin with us. senior editor for the news website, gideon litchfield. david, let's continue. >> gideon asked what our history was. i said we're really, really good friends. >> let me try to put joe's question differently. or at least the end of your debate here so we can put a period at the end of the sentence and bring more news into it since we're at the top of the hour. >> okay. >> is it okay to question at this point the world health
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organization as well as american health officials given what has happened in dallas, given what has happened around the world, given that there was a slow response, given that there have been so many deaths and ebola, it has come to the united states, now at least in two cases? >> mika, i first of all, let's be clear, i started my career as a journalist. i was an investigative reporter. i believe strongly that questions should be asked, need to be asked, in all situations. that's part of what makes our system work. in this case, the question is not whether we're asking the right questions, but whether we're going to accept answers on fund mental facts like how you contract ebola. my concern is that we not panic the american people to believe that this is an epidemic like a flu epidemic that can be spread widely without contact and that's the point that friedan has been making, that fauci has
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been making, because this is something that can lend itself to panic. >> absolutely. >> that's my concern. >> david, dr. frieden was on the show and said something on "meet the press," if you don't have enough medicine to deal with ebola it takes a long time to makes this medicine, grow it, and they don't have enough right now, that's a problem. >> well the truth is -- >> i would be a little worried. i don't know if i would panic. >> the truth is they're not even certain yet that they have the medication to treat ebola. i mean the medicine itself is speculative. but he said because of the way you have to produce it, it takes a while. they're working on vaccines, dr. fauci said, that may be useful. but these things do take time. you can't just expose people to things that haven't been tested. but no, but the point here is, does the case in dallas, there was a mishandling by the hospital in dallas and no doubt about it, that has the perverse
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virtue of having alerted other hospitals around the country. >> right. >> to follow the protocol. the cdc has sent seven different, as i understand it, directives to the hospitals in the last several months telling them how to handle it. this hospital had drills on how to handle it and -- >> it's unbelievable. >> and still did -- >> and they flubbed it. that's going to happen. there's human error that's going to happen. the best thing we can do is keep people informed. my point is let's not inflame, let's inform on this issue. >> david, i don't want to inflame either. we agree. that's great. so let me ask you, gideon, what happened to the world health organization? how did they drop the ball so badly? this is in part the point i was trying to make yesterday, this is in part why americans are skeptical. because you have the world health organization in the spring according to the "washington post" said nothing to see here. you have a world health organization in late july when the head of doctors without borders is saying this is much
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worse than you guys said. accused her of being overly pes si miss missic. the mentality from health organizations and we asked the head of the cdc last hour, why -- he said this is new. this is different. worse than ever before. he said, because the ball was dropped one time after another. >> yeah. i don't know why the w.h.o. didn't pick up the ball, but i don't think it makes sense to necessarily jump from the w.h.o. dropped the ball to health organizations in general don't know what they're doing. the w.h.o. and cdc are different things. west africa and the united states are different things. the fact that the mistakes were made at this hospital in texas, for instance, doesn't mean that ebola is now going to spread to everybody. >> right. >> it's actually fairly hard for ebola to spread, especially when you have a well-run health care system. the cdc is tracking every single one of the 48 people who came into contact with this patient. it's -- this stuff doesn't just immediately explode.
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so i think -- >> yeah. >> the w.h.o. question certainly are very troubling. it doesn't necessarily mean we're going to go to pieces here. >> willie, the balance that has to be struck, we don't want to panic people, at the same time you can't have government officials telling you, listen, we have it all taken care of. that's the bigger point. that chuck was making yesterday, that i was making yesterday, that i'm making today is, tough questions have to be asked and because they weren't early on, we have a crisis. it has come to the united states. and let's hope it stays contained in dallas with one patient. >> we should all be skeptical, specifically at this table, it's our job to be sketscle and ask those questions. i agree with david as i said in the last hour, is it a crisis in west africa, crisis in sierra leone and liberia? obviously yes. is it a crisis here? no, it's not. because we have the care we have and because of the job the cdc has done it's not a crisis. i don't think there's cause for panic.
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>> i want to get to another story here good for our panel. u.s. led air strikes are continuing against islamic state militants in iraq and syria, but the militant group is making advances in both countries and threatening even more bloodshed. witnesses say isis killed six iraqi soldiers in public in a town outside baghdad. in syria, kurd kurdish forces are trying to defend a keyboarder city but officials fear isis could take control within days. the militants took responsibility for beheading another british hostage and threatening to kill a man from indianapolis peter kassig, former army ranger, kidnapped while helping syrian refugees. meanwhile for the second time over the weekend, vice president joe biden apologized to a u.s. ally in the fight against isis. the apology to the uae centered on these comments where he suggested it supported mill tances in the region. >> our allies in the region are our largest problem in syria.
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the turks are great friends and i have a great relationship with erdogan who i spent time with, the saudis, emirates, et cetera, what were they doing? they poured hundreds of millions of dollars and thousands of tons of weapons into anyone who would fight against assad except that the people who were being -- who were being supplied were al nusra and al qaeda and the extremist elements of jihadis coming from other parts of the world. >> i want to get to the joe biden comments. he apologized to turkey and the joe biden apology tour. let's talk about first of all, isis. they are beheading soldiers. the outskirts of baghdad. and we seem to toggle between, isis is a jv team, right, to isis is an existential threat. when you start talking about isis not being a jv team and being an existential threat,
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people say wait a second, they're only 17,000. then they start moving them back towards the jv team. we don't know who they are, but i am wondering, how can they move about with such impunity? even now and behead six soldiers in town squares outside of baghdad. >> shows you how much of a force they are. they certainly -- i wouldn't describe them as a jv team. they're wreaking havoc in the areas that they control. i think that are they an existential threat to the united states, to western democracies, no, i don't think they are. >> are we exam rating their power in the middle east because of the beheading videos? >> i don't think you're exaggerating the threat of the group in terms of the havoc they're wreaking. you can't underestimate the threat of their ideology. that's the important thing. this is very tragic what is happening in terms of the beheadings and -- >> right. >> the kidnappings of these hostages and i actually, you
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know, i knew and i know peter, i met him on his way into syria the last time. we had lunch in beirut. he knew the risks of what he was getting involved in. you know, some of us that were there warned him against going into syria. he was a person who's going to help syrian refugees and syrian people. this is an organization that has no mercy if you're killing people who are trying to even help syrians. so i don't think you should underestimate them. but i also don't think that we should make it sound like they're on their way to i attack the united states any second. >> i want to talk about joe biden here. i don't understand the uae. i think turkey should be apologizing to us. bulls how frustrated is the administration, uae aside, with a lot of our, quote, middle eastern allies who have actually been propping up extremists in the regions with contributions? >> well, first of all, let me just say, it's ban long time
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since i've been in the administration. i don't want to possit myself as a spokesperson from the administration. >> just from what you read in newspapers. >> look, it has to be a source of frustration. qatar and, you know, there was a good piece this weekend about them wanting to be evers's friends and, you know, one memory i have of the middle east is sitting with ironically president mubarak and president obama and mubarak saying to obama, the middle east is a very complicated place. it is a very complicateds place and there are these cross-currents that are very hard to navigate which is why, you know, the wisdom of going in there in the first place as we did is a question. but now we see the effects. all the sectarian warfare, the double dealing, the concerns about extremist forces within their own countries that they try and quell through funding of schools and other institutions.
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>> right. >> it's really, really tough. and, you know, i -- the -- you know, i have great affection for joe biden. i think he's been a great vice president. evers's strength is their weakness. his is he -- he speaks his mind and he says what's on his mind. it doesn't mean what was on his mind wasn't true. the question is just whether it was the diplomatic thing. >> right. >> toe say. i think it's a real issue. i think these folks have to make a decision as to whether they can live with this budding extremist movement in their midst and if they can't, then they have to act on it. >> ayman? >> there's also a little bit of a flip side and i wanted to say from the arab countries' perspectives three years ago when the syrian revolution was beginning they were trying to push the united states to get more involved early on and try not to have to rely on these extremist groups which they ended up fighting and became the precursor to isis. speaking to a lot of arab
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diplomats they were trying to say they wanted more u.s. involvement early on and i think from their perspective it didn't come as quickly as they would like. >> we're learning so much more about it. willie? >> another angle, the fbi director, james comey talking about recruiting and some of these fighters going to fight with isis, including some from the united states. here's what he said. >> how many americans are fighting in syria on the side of the terrorists? >> in the area of a dozen or so. >> do you know who they are? >> yes. >> each and every one of them? >> i think of that dozen or so, i do. i hesitate only because i don't know what i don't know. >> some people call individuals who are radicalized lone wolves. is that the biggest threat we face? >> people use that term. it's not one i like. it conveys a sense of dignity i don't think they deserve. the home grown violent extremists are troubled souls seeking meaning in some misguided way and they come across the propaganda and become
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radicalized on their own, independent study, and able to equipment themselves with training through the internet and then engage in jihad after emerging from their basement. >> the name lone wolf offends you? >> it does. i prefer lone rat. to capture the kind of person we're talking about. >> ayman, there was question over the weekend some reporting about how effective american-led air strikes inside syria have been and sort of dismantling and dispersing isis. what are you hearing from your reporting on the ground about how effective they've been some. >> i don't think they've done enough to completely destroy or degrade isis. when you look at the press releases coming out of centcom they're taking out pick-ups and humvees and tanks and a group of fighters and this is an organization that is thriving on its ability to be fluid and adapt to the battlefield environment. they're posing threats to kobani, executing iraqi soldiers, their ability to be dispersed regroup, recounter and attack is proving to be quite
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formidable and a problem for the u.s. military. >> they're counting a missile hitting a 1978 toyota pick-up truck. >> don't degrade the 1978 toyota pick-up truck. battlefield vehicle. >> it is a serious -- but they're talking about -- >> battlefield equipment. let's just admit it. these air strikes, i know we have to do something, we have to do something, but unless you boots on the ground, and i'm sure as hell not talking about american boots on the ground, that will sweep from village to village to village they're going to be there for a very long time, gideon, aren't they? >> this is where biden's comments about turkey become relevant because erdogan got upset with biden because biden said that erdogan had admitted to him that, you know, that turkey had been too free and easy about letting supplies and weapons in and militants through the border into syria. now the problem is that turkey
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has a very mixed up agenda in its involvement here in this fight. it approved finally last thursday spending turkish militant incursions into syria and iraq, but turkey wants to at least as much as wipe out isis it wants to wipe out the kurds. the kurdish separatists and pkk, the people who are going to be doing a lot of the boots on the ground work. >> yeah. >> turkey's interest s and the u.s. interests clash. this has to do with the tension with biden and erdogan. >> gideon and david -- >> let me ask david before we go, we showed a poll last hour of kansas. what's happening in kansas. republicans might ask, what's the matter with kansas. put it up right now. you have an independent beating pat roberts by ten points. can the republican party take the senate back and they have to take the senate back or else
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this year is going to be seen as a colossal political loss for them. i'm hearing that from the top of the parties. can they take the senate back if they lose kansas? >> it very -- i think it's harder. i think iowa is going to be the key race, joe. i really think as i look at how this all is, i would watch iowa closely because i think that could be the tiebreaker in this whole deal. kansas is definitely complicated. you say what's the matter with kansas? what's the matter is you have to live there in order to be the senator. >> oh, wow. >> here we go. >> it's -- no, he's right. it's a dick lugar problem. >> still ahead on "morning joe" -- david, thank you. >> big time democrat donors turning their backs on the clintons? we'll tell you who's set to cash in on the liberal money shift. and then from combat zones to a college football field, the remarkable story of one veteran chasing his dreams. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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ick today.
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that's nice. let's take a look at the morning papers. >> we're blood he red. i want to be orange tomorrow. can i ask you something. >> okay. >> who's this little guy that's on the front of the tabloids. >> oh. >> like who's this little guy. >> he's a well-known new york attorney. >> i don't like that story. >> i don't know the story but -- >> here's a little guy. don't know who he is. but he's on both of the like tabloids. i'm mot going to read it, it boers me. >> i don't know anything about the story. he's a well-known lawyer in new york city. >> salacious story with a serious -- >> if it's a salacious story i'm going to read it then. >> let's move on. "usa today," a fast-moving and powerful typhoon in japan killed one u.s. airmen and left two others missing. reports say the three service members were pulled into rough surf taking photos off the coast of okinawa. rescue workers are battling
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tough winds and rains in hopes of finding the missing men. officials say the typhoon phanfoen packed winds 110 miles an hour and forced as many as 400,000 people into temporary shelters. protesters in hong kong have made some concessions in their demands. unblocking roads and allowing government workers to return to their jobs this morning. the city's leader had warned demonstrators, quote, all necessary actions would be taken to clear the streets today in hong kong's business direct. about 300 people remain standing outside the government's main building this morning. a significantly smaller group than the tens of thousands that have been demonstrating over the last week. >> from the kansas city star, the royals face the l.a. dodgers in the final game of the alds. the angels were up 1-0 on the brink against the royals. kansas city's alex gordon at bat with bases loaded in the first, he hits a deep shot off the centerfield wall and brings everybody home. >> wow. >> eric and mike --
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>> wustokis helped to add to the lead each hitting a home run in the fifth. lorenzo kaine, first a diving catch to albert pujols. >> look at that. >> and a charging one to make a great grab. kansas city moves on to the alcs after sweeping the angels. >> i'm sorry. something happened in baltimore too. >> yes. >> that is just -- >> the royals are an amazing team. >> cool to see george up there cheering, clapping in the box. led them the last time they were in the playoffs in 1985. a fun team to watch. so are the orioles, the tigers facing elimination against the o's, scoreless sixth inning, man on first. >> that one is hit hard right-field line. cruz watching this one slice and it is a fair ball home run. >> nelson cruz is a home run hitting machine. >> that's so cool. >> two-run shot hitting the foul
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pole. they win 2-1 eliminating the tigers after a three-game sweep. baltimore hosts the royals in the alcs on friday. >> willie -- >> i'm going to baltimore. >> you're going to go friday. >> i think so. >> let me ask you this, do you think it will cause an outbreak. >> what? >> dissension on the set if i -- because i -- i'm going to admit. >> k.c.? >> i ordered a royals cap last week. >> did you? >> i did. >> wow. >> from ebay. >> like this sweater. >> another one from ebay? >> this is an ebay sweater. $29.95. last -- you can touch it. that's okay. you can touch it. >> last year, i kind of let claire down and i let the good people of st. louis down, so i -- i have decided i'm cheering for missouri. i don't care. i want the cardinals and i want the royals and i actually bought a royals cap last week. >> you're well within your rights. underdog, good team to get behind. >> all the oriole caps here. i don't want this to be another
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east coast year on the set of "morning joe." i'm bringing my k.c. and cardinals cap. i got a cardinals cap that claire gave me and i'm going to missouri. >> you might want to keep your word with claire just once. >> you could have a royals/cardinals world series. >> that would be awesome. bringing the caps in on friday and friday i'll wear my royals cap. >> and your orioles. >> i guess i am. >> for now. >> camden yard. we ought to go down to camden yard. let's go to politico, chief white house correspondent is mike allen. >> i love him. >> a look at the playbook. good to see you, sir. >> good morning. >> politico reporting not only are some democrats not ready for hillary, some of the party's big donors are quietly looking to back other candidates. who are we talking about here? >> the dream is elizabeth warren. she says she's not running. what we have is a lot of donors who feel like hillary clinton is not addressing their issues. she's too hawkish, too close to wall street. they're concerned about her
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views on climate, on money and politics and these are all issues that people give money on. and so ken folgal talked to some of the biggest donors in the democratic party and they would love to fund a challenger to her, if nothing else, to push her to the left on these issues. >> who are they talking about? >> they're talking to the former senator from virginia, jim webb. >> yeah. >> dreaming of elizabeth warren. of course the maryland governor martin o'malley is meeting with a lot of big donors. this is interesting. behind the scenes, we hear he's being smart. he's not presenting h ining him an alternative to hillary clinton or trying to bash her down. he says if she doesn't run, i could be your guy. so hillary clinton is exposed by this new law that lets billionaireses give to prop up a candidate so just like sheldon adelson did with newt gingrich could that happen with one of the other democratic candidates.
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>> jim webb was on "meet the press" yesterday. pretty impressive. >> i like jim webb a lot. >> i think he could occupy a pretty good space there. that's the thing, if hillary runs and runs against just one democrat, one major democrat. >> yeah. >> probably have 40% right there. you know what i'm saying. >> you think he gets in? >> i think so. if he wants it. if he gets the money from some of these people i think he will. >> whoever it was, she would be stronger. >> kate snow joins us from omaha where an nbc news cameraman will land this morning to be treated for ebola. plus the other medical emergency that has us very concerned this morning. >> gosh. >> we're going to ask a leading expert at columbia university medical center has a 4-year-old boy could go to sleep in seemingly good health and never wake up. more "morning joe" when we return. ♪
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the nbc news free lance photographer diagnosed with ebola is in the united states after stopping in maine to refuel the plane carrying ashoka mukpo is now headed to the nebraska medical center where he'll be treated. let's bring in nbc news national correspondent kate snow live from omaha. we understand that plane is set to land in the next hour?
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>> yeah. mika, if they're on time it will be about an hour and 15 minutes from now here at the airfield in omaha, nebraska. they'll go straight to nebraska medical center where they are ready and waiting. ashoka mukpo's long journey home began overnight on a tarmac in liberia where he boarded a specially equipped plane. inside the plane like this one, multiple layers of protection key signed to make sure no one would ever come in contact with the virus. on the ground in omaha, another team from nebraska medical center. >> he'll be fully suited in a suit from head to toe and a face mask covering his entire face. literally not one inch of his body will be exposed and then our health care workers will be -- have protective equipment on very similar, covered head to toe. >> when you cross the red line there's no turning back. >> reporter: the medical director of the biocontainment unit took us across the red line into the area where no one will be able to go without full
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protective gear. >> this is his room right here. everything is carefully monitored. >> you hold this open more than a few seconds an alarm goes off. there's a break in the barrier system. ashoka's family won't be able to get near the patient room but he has a link to the outside world. the camera will give him the ability to video chat with him hiss family down the hall. we spoke with his parents sunday before they flew to omaha. >> the fact that he's feeling well right now or relatively well, that his symptoms are not severe yet and he's also about to get fantastic medical care is an enormous relief after the very, very stressful few days we've been through. >> every time i would ask him how he's doing or how he's feeling, he clearly would respond with, i'm just getting myself through this day until i get on the plane. >> reporter: one piece of really good news, we're told ashoka mukpo walked on to the plane in liberia with assistance but he was walking. that's good news.
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meantime nancy snyderman and her team are feeling fine, we're told, and plans are being made for their return. back to you. >> nbc's kate snow, thank you. and willie, i've been e-mailing with nancy and she says they're fine. it's just cumbersome for sure. and tough. >> 21 days i guess. >> yeah. >> quarantine. let's bring in dr. stephen morse the director of infectious disease epidemiology at the columbia university medical center. thanks for coming in this morning. >> pleasure to join you. >> we were talking before we came on the air about how this has all been handled. how do you think the cdc has done stateside? >> this is the first time they've had to deal with an actual patient coming in and i think on the whole, they have done well. there have been a few slips along the way. i suspect the next time will be better, but cdc is doing the best it can with the resources it has and so is the state. i think, you know, we all think
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i'm sure the cdc thinks that they should have gotten to the patients family a little bit sooner, much sooper perhaps, but i think those are some of the lessons that we learn by unfortunately making these mistakes and correcting them. >> there's been a lot of public debate, including on this set this morning, about how concerned americans should be about ebola coming here. only one confirmed case so far, more than 7,000 in west africa. what do you tell people watching today about how concerned are you as a physician? >> well, there will be imported cases. this is almost always true. and it's been true of every infectious. but ebola is not going to establish itself here. i don't think it's going to be a real threat to americans if patients, people who come in with ebola are recognized, handled by health care workers or when they come into the airports. i think that it can be contained very easily and very
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appropriately. >> all right. i want to move to the enterovirus. we have been reporting about this 4-year-old boy from new jersey who went to bed last night. the most they could see wrong with him is that he had pink eye. otherwise he was perfectly fine. he died. and it has been linked directly to a strain of the enterovirus. let me give you other numbers. 500 cases across the united states. 43 states reporting cases. five people with enterovirus who have died. and one death now linked directly. we have a 10-year-old rhode island girl diagnosed with it who died early this month, also suffering from a staph infection. what should parents know that they don't know about this and how concerned should we be compared to the ebola story that we've been covering? because i feel like this is going under the radar? >> well, i mean, the enterovirus is obviously a surprise to all of us. there have been mass events before, you know, in georgia, for example, a few years ago, there was a fairly large
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outbreak, but we haven't seen fatalities before and we don't know the reason. it may just be this is such a large outbreak that although fatalities are rare, especially in people with medical underlying medical conditions, that if you have enough people infectioned you may have the occasional fatality, tragic as it is. the precautions are the same you would take for your kids with any cold virus that's going around, any respiratory infection. so, you know, good hygiene, watch your kids to see how they're doing, if there's enterovirus going around. >> is this moving more quickly than medical officials expected. you said it was a surprise. >> a surprise in the sense that this was the largest outbreak we've had so far and we don't quite understand why this outbreak is so large. >> dr. stephen morse, thank you. up next, how the battlefields of iraq and afghanistan helped one man make his life-long dream of
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playing division 1 football come true. his inspiring story is next. turn the trips you have to take,
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of all the things daniel rodriguez carries, a flag may mean the most. for 24-year-old walk-on, the journey to get here started in a different uniform. after already serving a tour in iraq, rodriguez was deployed here to the province in afghanistan where at times he filmed himself in battle. >> watch. >> stationed in a violent remote outpost near the pakistani border, rodriguez met pfc kevin
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thompson and in the fall of 2009, the two made a pledge. >> let's promise each other that we get out, we follow our hearts, do what we want to do. mine was to walk on and play college football and get a degree. >> that was part of a 2012 espn piece profiling daniel rodriguez who's not only a decorated war hero but a division 1 football player for clemson university before joining the tigers as a wide receiver he served two tours of duty in iraq and afghanistan. the retired sergeant is the author of a new memoir "rise, a soldier, a dream, and a promise kept." >> willie, look at him. he dresses like a clemson man. >> fantastic. >> i was going to say, looks like tailgating before the clemson game. >> what are we doing here? >> bringing the tide home. >> it's an honor to have you here. thanks for being here. we should mention recipient of the purple heart, bronze star, among other honors serving this country in iraq and afghanistan. tell me about this dream to play football at clemson?
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when did it start? >> you know, clemson wasn't originally the bound location but it was one of those things in the mountaintops leaving football out of high school i wanted something more and the military, i lost a lot of friends and it was promising a good friend of mine kevin thompson, i would try to play football again and go back to school. through the grapevine clemson heard about me with a viral youtube video i put out as a recruitment video and one thing led to another and here i am. >> i'll read the quote from the head coach at clemson, i clicked on it probably like a lot of people i was mesmerized by the video and his work ethic, his drive to chase a dream. tell me about that first phone call from coach? >> it actually came in the form of an e-mail. said, hey, head coach, we would love to talk to you about an opportunity. i was in history class at a local community college. i walked out of my class and called the number immediately. i would love to have you come down here, take a visit, somebody that could represent our team and program the right
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way. i didn't know where clemson, south carolina, was. i drove down. >> that's great. >> i drove down, met with the staff, the facility. >> right by the big peach. >> so it was one of those things i knew it was a home i was going to be a tiger one way or another. >> so back up if you could. because i want to hear more about that promise and i want to hear about kevin thompson. >> yeah. kevin was a great guy and, you know, as we do in the military, we just talk a lot when we're not fighting overseas deployed and you get to know the guy next to you who is a brother of mine. we would talk about what we wanted to do, the hardships we faced in the military from seeing combat and losing friends, just one of those things we didn't want that to define our lives. for me it was going back to school, getting an education and trying to play football again something i loved and i lost. he wanted to go back to his hometown and do his own thing. two weeks later we were involved in a battle in october 3rd of 2009 one of the bloodiest battles in afghanistan to date and he was killed in front of me. it was one of the things i got
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out of the military i suffered through a lot of depression but holding on to that promise is what kept me driving and keep going and play the game of football in his name. >> there was this space between the time you left afghanistan. >> yes. >> until you run out on the field with 90,000 screaming for you. what was it like when you were suffering ptsd? >> the transition is difficult. a lot of people see me and my story. veteran turned football. they don't see the year and a half space of daunting lifestyle i had. there was a lot of depression, you know, thoughts of suicide. my friends committed suicide. drinking. a lot of things that influenced me in a negative way. it all reflected on me thinking positively and trying to overcome that and waking up one morning saying i want more for myself. i felt if i didn't live my life to maximize my potential my friends died in vain. i needed to represent them in a proper way of doing something positive with my life so that they didn't die in vain. that was the ultimate just leading me to where i am and living a life of positive
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instead of thinking negative all the someti the time. >> that is great. >> when you think about the dark place that happens in the months and years after returning home from war, are you as surprised as some are to hear the number 22 a day? >> yeah. >> it is surprising. >> 22 suicides a day. >> i'm victim of having friends that have committed suicide coming back stateside, even in afghanistan and iraq, i knew people that had committed suicide over there. and you come back and you just feel lost. you come back in a state of mind you're not sure what your purpose is. you're patrolling the streets like i was at 18 in baghdad and then afghanistan fighting toe to toe with taliban and come home, your rifle is gone, you've traded in your uniform and trying to -- >> who are you? >> get back and reintegrate in a world who doesn't know who you are. it's just sad. a lot of us can't make the transition. for me i was fortunate enough to have my eye on something as football is therapeutic as just a therapy for me and helped me a lot. >> the book is -- >> it's amazing. it's "rise, it's a soldier, it's
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a dream and a promise kept" and wow, what a great story. thank you so much for being here. >> daniel rodriguez. thank you so much. >> we appreciate it. >> coming up from college football to an nfl team. >> if only he had been on a better college team. >> oh, wait. i can't say that. alabama lost this weekend. >> to an nfl team that could probably be beaten by most college teams, we wallow in the hapless new york jets. really, we do? willie takes us through yesterday's nfl action, next. it's monday, a brand new start. with centurylink visionary cloud infrastructure, and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable, secure, and agile. (receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups.
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you guys want to do some football highlights or something? let's do sunday night football. maybe you missed it. new england leading 7-0 in the first. tom brady finds gronk for the completion. brady breaks 50,000 yards passing. brady finishes with 292, a couple touchdowns. new england, there was a lot of hand-wringing up there about the season. blows out the previously undefeated bengals 43-17. tom brady in the history books. san diego backup quarterback michael vick in for geno smith.
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they're down 21-0. in comes vick. doesn't even make one shred of difference. >> so did vick not do well? >> 31-0. >> he did nothing whatsoever. >> how bad is it? >> they want to bring back tebow. >> you can find him doing inspirational stories over on "gma." >> dude, it couldn't be worse. >> it's bleak, man. >> i don't know if rex is going to survive the season. i like rex ryan, but that's a spiral. >> i was surprised when in a moth was on here, blunt about it. there's a culture problem he top. i don't know how rex survives the season. >> there have been whispers but now they're not even competitive so something's going to give here. denver/bronc denver/broncos. peyton manning. seven-yard touchdown. manning's 500th career touchdown.
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joins brett favre as the only two quarterbacks to ever reach that mark. a fantasy owner's dream come true. the broncos and the card, their first look 41-20 in a blowout. arlington, texas/cowboys trailing houston 7-3 in the third quarter. tony romo back to pass. eludes the pressure, and launches the deep ball. this ends in overtime. romo with another off-balance throw. >> he wasn't even looking. >> dez bryant. what a catch. >> he wasn't even looking when he threw the ball. >> are we going to see -- no, we're not going to see it again but it was great. here's the game-winning field goal. they beat the texans 20-17. look out, the cowboys putting a little season together. >> are they really? >> yeah, 4-1, looking good. to new orleans. the saints have the ball in overtime. tied at 31 with the bucs. robinson takes the handoff. shredding tacklers.
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that's the game winning touchdown. saints win 37-31. to nashville where it's get ugly for the titans. browns on their way back from a deficit against the titans. little over a minute to play. hoyer finds benjamin in the back of the end zone. they were down 25 points -- >> so these are the first, like, seconds of the nfl i've seen this season. who's looking good? >> well -- >> the cowboys are obviously a surprise. >> dallas is 4-1. giants have now won three in a row. they've lost their first two. san diego's 4-1. some interesting teams coming through here. >> what do you have, mika? >> oh, my gosh, look at this. what are you doing, mika? >> eat them. eat them all. >> the burgers from baltimore. listen, thomas, mika is going to baltimore friday night.
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she's going to take her daughters to the orioles game. >> i think i need to do the dance. don't you think it was the dance that did it? >> thomas, can i ask you a quick question, before you start dancing -- >> i'm a little deaf in this ear, you have to turn it up. ♪ magic magic >> go, royals. >> such a good weekend. i lost my voice on friday screaming at the television. such a good game. >> i'm glad i could help. >> then this weekend watching the game yesterday because it was my birthday over the weekend. >> oh, happy birthday! >> a whole box of these by myself. >> that's a good birthday. >> watching the game yesterday, eating these. >> by the way, thomas -- >> i wish i was. >> 300-pound kid. anyway, you all need to go to the orioles game. >> can i ask you something,
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there's always this guy that would, like, shake the let me n lemonade up. >> wild bill? at memorial stadium? >> no, not memorial stadium. >> this is a strange show. >> it's magic. ♪ magic magic >> will you still love me if i root for the royals? >> i saw the segment a second ago. you were trying to suck up to claire mccaskill. >> i didn't try -- go royals! before earning enough cash back from bank of america to help entertain some friends at the beach. before earning 1% cash back everywhere, every time. and 2% back at the grocery store. even before he got 3% back on gas. all with no hoops to jump through. rafael was inspired to use his bankamericard cash rewards credit card
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kansas city royals, they are an extraordinary story. unbelievable. and the fact they swept the angels is just kind of mind blowing. >> angels have the best record in baseball this year. dominated their division. dominated the american league. had to fight their way in. and now they sweep the best team in baseball perhaps in los angeles and move on. how cool is this? it feels like it's 1985. you've got the orioles and the royals. they're going to be playing in bald mo baltimore on friday. >> i'm going to baltimore on friday. i usually hate him for giving me those cookies. >> you're just a hater. >> i'm so excited.
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the dance worked. >> what's the dance? >> we had -- >> would you like to recreate the dance? >> thomas sings magic, magic, and i just burst out -- >> worst dancer i've ever seen in my life. >> my teenagers will never be the same. >> the tigers also getting swept. i hated to see that. so we've got quite a lineup. >> oh, yes. >> so the nationals, willie, a lot of weeping and nashing of teeth in washington, d.c. sunday morning over the longest game in playoff history. >> 16 innings was it? >> 18 innings. >> six hours and change. they're in some trouble now. >> they're in big trouble. it looks like the series to be watching is the dodgers and the cardinals. >> we've got a lot to talk about. we have political writer for "the new york times." we're going to start this
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morning with the ebola outbreak. in just a few hours, another american who tested positive for ebola will arrive at nebraska medical center in omaha. the freelance nbc camera man who was working with dr. nancy snyderman in africa will be treated by dozens of specialists. he is the fifth american to be diagnosed with the virus. in dallas, the cdc says the man who slipped by screeners and into the u.s. is, quote, fighting for his life. officials say thomas eric duncan is in critical condition and family members say he is on a respirator. we have reporters on the ground following both cases. nbc's john yang is live at the nebraska medical center. he is set to arrive today. what can you tell us about how the hospital is getting ready? >> they're ready, mika. there's a bio containment unit, one of the biggest in america.
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about 40 medical personnel will be treating him. once he lands here in omaha, he'll land at the main airport here, epley field. the plane will taxi to a remote part of the airport. this is a part of the airport where he'll encounter no public. it's not a part of the airport where the general public would be. he'll be wearing a protective suit covered head to toe. no part of his body exposed. he'll be completely covered. once he gets here, they'll be evaluating him here at the hospital. about 40 medical personnel. people actually volunteering to treat him for ebola. >> all right, thanks very much for that. we're going to get to mark potter in just a minute for the apparently worsening condition
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of the other patient. according to the latest statistics by the world health organization, the death toll stands at over 3,400. but the actual number is likely to be worse. the country of sierra leone had its worst day since the outbreak began, recording 121 deaths in a single day. and the growing crisis is bringing attention to the initial response by the international community. a top official at the world health organization tells "the washington post" the group may have waited too long to respond to the outbreak. it took the w.h.o. 4 1/2 months to declare a global health emergency. by that time, it was too late. joining us, the professor of infectious disease, dr. david hayman. dr. heyman investigated the first ebola outbreak back in 1976. doctor, it's good to have you this morning.
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>> a blistering report in "the washington post" yesterday about a lot of mixed signals. starting last spring. you had a moment at the end of july where the head of doctors without borders was begging the world health organization to step up and declare this an international emergency. she was called overly pessimistic. why so many missed signals in this outbreak? >> it's really not clear why this outbreak wasn't dealt with earlier. it's always clear if it is dealt with in a rural area where there's better community organization, village chiefs, they can help with the response. but it got out of a rural area, unlike the 25 previous outbreaks that were stopped in rural areas. and now it's in an urban area. >> so, so what can -- what should the united states be doing? what should the world community be doing right now to slow the rapid spread of this disease down in west africa? >> and are they doing it?
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>> most important is the three principles that have stopped outbreaks in the past. that's finding and isolating patients and making sure that when they're he's laisolated, h workers don't get infected. tracing those who have been in contact with the patient. checking their temperature. if they get sick, diagnosing, if it's ebola, putting them in the hospital. the third is making sure that the community understands how to prevent infection and if there are services to bury dead bodies and to take care of those who are sick. so this is what's required. >> okay, doctor. i guess i want to know what your concern level is about whether or not that can happen in africa. and as it pertains to the u.s., we've been hearing medical officials saying there's a certain drug to treat ebola and it's very limited in supply and i'm confused how we can be so sure that it can be contain and we have the ability and that
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everything is going to be okay if there aren't enough drug, to treat it. >> well, there certainly aren't any drug, to treat it, that's clear. and the outbreak must be stopped by the traditional means that we just spoke about. isolating patients, tracing contacts, making sure that people are fever are diagnosed and the community understanding. very difficult in urban areas in africa. there are some hopes. there are some remedies that could be tried which might even be sustainable. for example, the blood of people who have survived from ebola contains antibodies. if those can be collected and provided to patients who are still sick, it may be they can decrease the virus in their blood and actually make them better. hopefully, that's what will happen. and these are some of the things that need to be studied. anti-viral drugs are present but they're not in such a supply they could be tried at present. >> doctor, thank you very much. i think there's a couple
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unanswered questions about how it's being dealt with here in the u.s. that just don't add up in terms of the drugs that there are to treat this and how people are getting it. >> we had a fascinating discussion yesterday on "meet the press." and you had david axelrod and gwen eiffel on the side of, i'm sorry, let's say it, they're like the cop in "the simpsons." >> not here to defend himself. >> chief wigham. things will be blowing up. he goes, "nothing to see here, move along." >> no, that is -- what? >> but there are so many unanswered questions. you had yesterday, david jumped me, because i simply quoted the the doctor that got ebola and came back to the united states. would talked about what a horrible situation it was. and right now you've got the government saying, don't worry
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about it. nothing to, you know, don't panic. and if you ask any tough questions, suddenly you're panicking. and chuck todd brought up a great point yesterday. you look at all the scandals over the past 18 months, willie, and when the government says don't worry about it, well, forget about barack obama. go back to impeachment, the 2000 recount, missed info on n9/11, the housing bubble. the secret service scandal. obamacare launch. na wiretapping. a.p. james rosen. the federal government telling us to not ask tough questions and not to worry about it is a problem. if you read "the washington post," it is very clear, they've been downplaying this from the very beginning. i don't think americans are going to just sit back and go, it's cool, the government has it taken care of. i don't believe the government has got it taken care of. why trust the government on something this important?
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i think they have to prove to us they have it taken care of. >> the problem is, they may be right in this case that there's nothing to panic about but because of all the things they've listed over the last two decades or so, people don't inti intinktively trust what they hear from the government anymore. think obviously we have better implements in place to help contain this. as you say, no one's going to take anything at face value. i think it's also smart not to panic right now. listen, very, very different from the way they're capable of handling things in west africa. >> this is what bothered me yesterday. by simply raising the questions "the washington post" raised about how world health organization last spring said, this is small, don't worry about it, this is small. the head of the world health organization, when this had already exploded, had the head of doctors without borders coming, begging, saying, please, pay more attention to this. this is an explosion.
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>> this is the one thing i will tell you, you can't argue, they were completely on top of. to africa. they saw it coming. >> they're talking about it. the only problem is, nick, from all reports, the response right now is too slow. we were talking about boots on the ground. >> what's funny is the same people, the same governments that were saying about the africa crisis, don't worry about it, it's going to be fine, right, and they were wrong then. the same ones saying about the u.s. version of it, don't worry about it, it's going to be fine. as you were saying, we have a huge public health infrastructure here. we have -- >> by the way, we can add the world health organization? the united nations. all government agencies have felt so far why -- and they underestimated this. i think we need to be asking tough searing questions. >> there's no question about that. i do think that right now in the u.s. you have a bigger chance of being shot in the head than
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getting this virus. so there's some element of do you want to create a panic. do you want people if they see someone sneezing in their office running home and going crazy. >> no, but we want to deal with flights coming in. >> most americans don't understand. i know all the smart guys, all the smart women understand why we continue to allow flights coming from west africa. i can just tell you, i'm a regular guy. i'm a simple country lawyer, willie. you've seen me in court. you know. >> very good. >> sputoon, the whole bit. most of us simple folk, we don't understand why you keep letting the flights unabated. saying, oh, it will stop relief efforts. really, is there not a better way to make sure we can screen to make sure flights going over to west africa with relief workers able to come back? i want us to declare war on ebola. i really do.
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so i'm not saying a lot of stooges i've been reading, it's their problem. no, it's our problem. it's the world's problem. i don't understand why we can't take a tougher line on people flying into this country. >> a 4-year-old boy dies after coming down with the enterovirus after appearing to be in good health before the disease claimed his life. what parents need to know about that health emergency. plus, one state is considering sending less criminals to jail. we'll tell you which one and why. but first -- >> can we put him in jail just for crimes against fashion? >> crimes against everything. crimes against fashion? >> crimes against fashion. >> how about just basic human behavior. bill karins has the forecast. bill, keep your hands to yourself. >> i always do, always will. good morning, everyone. after a cold chilly weekend in the great lakes and the northeast, some better weather for you. unfortunately, we have some
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severe weather to talk about too. starting this morning with the heat on in hartford. 40 degrees is your morning temperature. some people scraping frost off their windshields. notice some rain moving into buffalo and pittsburgh late today. all morning long, we've been tracking these thunderstorms. pretty good complex of them went through the little rock area. they've weakened over tennessee. they're right over the top of nashville as we speak. also for shreveport to dallas, interstate 20, we've had some pretty heavy rains early this morning. as we go through the afternoon, the storms fire back up ahead of the cold front. about 19 million people at risk of wind damage, hail, maybe even a few tornadoes. if we get any tornadoes, watching western tennessee, northern mississippi, the favored spots. this goes to lexington and louisville. your forecast for today. northeast is great. everyone in the west is great. a hot weekend in california. tuesday, that mess that's today in the tennessee and mississippi valleys, that all is heading for
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the northeast tomorrow. not severe weather, but it will be a rainy tuesday in areas from d.c. to philly to new york. in new england, a lot of the peak leaves will be coming down. we leave you with a shot. the leaves have yet to start changing. maybe a little tint there on the mall. washington, d.c. in for a beautiful monday. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. your customers, our financing. your aspirations, our analytics. your goals, our technology.
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it's a fresh approach on education-- superintendent of public instruction tom torlakson's blueprint for great schools. torlakson's blueprint outlines how investing in our schools will reduce class sizes, bring back music and art, and provide a well-rounded education. and torlakson's plan calls for more parental involvement. spending decisions about our education dollars should be made by parents and teachers, not by politicians. tell tom torlakson to keep fighting for a plan that invests in our public schools. time now to take a look at
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the papers. a 4-year-old is the first child to die after contracting the enterovirus. eli's parents say other than having pink eye, their son appeared to be in good health before he passed away. eli was the youngest of three triplets. leaving behind two sisters. his father describes him as a shy puppy who was full of love. the cdc says as of friday, there are 543 reported cases of enterovirus d-68 across 43 states. >> eli went to sleep perfectly fine. and didn't wake up from this virus. this is -- we've withbeen talki about it. everybody is talking about ebola. this is certainly this is so frightening. >> earlier, we spoke to the director of the centers for disease control. for people watching, for people with children, i know it's in 43 states, in washington, d.c. what should they know about
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this? >> yeah, bottom line is, it's a new situation. we haven't seen this kind of widespread transmission. it does tend to fade as the fall goes on. and what tends to happen next is flu season. it's time to get a flu shot. make sure that you wash your hands. don't go out if you're sick. cover your cough. if your child has asthma, make sure their asthma is well controlled. that's what we've seen in some more severe illnesses here. >> how could a 4-year-old boy go to bed with pink eye and not wake up? what is this virus? >> i can't comment on that individual case. what i can tell you is we've seen quite a wide variety of symptoms from mild to severe. for those with severe disease, most of them have been children who have had asthma or other respiratory problems that have been made worse by this infection. >> the "san francisco chronicle," one of silicon's valleys largest companies will split into two. hewlett-packard will divide its printer and computer business from it's corporate hardware
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business. the company is trying to stay relevant as the pc market continues to change. hp currently has more than 300,000 employees. is on track to hit $112 billion in revenue this year. >> the san diego union tribune. california voters will decide how to scale back the state's prison population. a new measure would transform multiple nonviolent crimes into misdemeanors punishable by brief jail time rather than long stays in a state prison. if approved, the measure, entitled proposition 47 would apply retroactively, lowering the penalties for thousands already serving time. voters will desicide on the measure. >> you'll see this in one state after another after another after another. states. voters are going to look at criminalization of not just marijuana but other substances and actual possession itself of drugs that 20 years ago would have put you in jail for 20 years.
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i just think they're going to say, come on, enough's enough. people want to do that to themselves, let them do that to themselves but why should we be paying for them in prison for 20 years. >> you look at the prison overcrowding problem and you look at some of the sentences. if you are pulled over in your car in some states with a little bit of marijuana, say, you can go to jail for five, six years. i don't think most common people, people of good sense, think that's a good idea. >> it's insanity. the daily mail. a japanese zoo now knows why its attempt to get two spotted high y hyenas to mate. it turns out both were male. >> this happened to me in high school and i couldn't figure it out. >> what are you talking about? >> i just thought i was bad at the you know -- >>hamsters? >> hyenas? >> no, they were hyenas. >> it was my science experiment for ninth, tenth, 11th and 12th
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grades. >> flunked out of high school. zoo officials say they were told the pair were of opposite sex when they acquired the animals from a zoo in south korea. despite several attempts by the zoo it seems -- >> can't you just look? >> -- breeding behavior. this prompted the zoo to conduct tests to determine the animal's genders. >> why do you have to conduct tests? >> test was they lifted the legs u and then they could see. >> wow, okay. >> what, what? >> what did dan just tell you? >> it's very hard to tell. >> it's hard to tell on hyenas. >> let's go to the miami herald. the coast guard has rescued a man trying to make his way to bermuda. he wanted to outline the bermuda triangle in a bubble called hydrapod.
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you know what, this guy deserved to have the hydrapod pop and drown. so it has a metal frame and allows the user to run on water. similar to a hamster we'll. officials say he activated his locator beacon off the coast of florida after becoming disoriented due to -- >> extreme fatigue. come on, dude. come on. you should have figured that out on south beach. >> still ahead, they made hundreds of millions of dollars in illegal profits during a vast insider training scheme. the new yorker has a behind the scenes look at the capital saga, a story that could be the plot of a movie. first, a man who has spent more time on the ground in africa than most. dr. jeffrey saks joins us. "morning joe" after a quick break. you probably know xerox
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we have live pictures from omaha, nebraska, where a fifth american diagnosed with the ebola virus just landed at the
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nebraska medical center that will treat ashoka mukpo, a came cameraman with nbc news. also, staff writer with the hil, lees veback joins us as well. dr. sachs, have you been watching the debate here on "morning joe"? >> i've been watching part of it. >> "the washington post" article talked about all the missed signals from the w.h.o. and the spring then in late july. there was a horrifying part of that story that you've touched on before. and need for more money, for better oral health care. where you have people on the front lines not even having the basics like latex gloves, basic protections. >> this is an epidemic that can be brought under control in a relatively straight forward way because it's not transmitted by
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air. it's not transmitted in a way that measles or other very infectious diseases are -- >> why is it spread so quickly? >> it spreads only if people that are infected are not put in some kind of isolation clinic where they can get some treatment. and so if the local system is completely overwhelmed so that people don't go to clinics, they're dying at home, their families are taking care of them. when they're buried, the bodies are not being safely managed. then you get an epidemic. if this is kept under control, so that a person is potentially diagnosed and potentially infected is diagnosed and then put some place safely -- >> so why hasn't that happened? >> because these are impoverished places and completely underresourced and nobody pays attention until an epidemic breaks out.
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>> you had warnings before the epidemic broke out, warnings that were ignored. >> i have spent my life saying you can't leave people without basic health care. west africa is a place even a year ago i tried to get funding for health workers in liberia of all places. this is before the epidemic. i've been told, we have no money, this is the wrong cycle. >> why did the w.h.o. fail so miserably in picking u the signs early? >> i think two things. one, they made mistakes because earlier ebola epidemics have kind of controlled themselves. second, they are at this point in turmoil because of budget cuts. cdc also is experiencing big budget cuts right now. we don't invest in these things, joe. we take it for granted. things are fine until a crisis. and these places are chronically underinvested right now. you look at any list of what's potentially a disaster for the
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world. epidemic diseases right at the top of the list. >> this is a natural security issue. >> of course it is. this is a human security issue. >> it's a national security issue. this should not be an issue for republicans or democrats to fund the cdc. >> interestingly by the way health care has been an issue where both republicans and democrats for global health have tended to support these initiatives. we haven't invested an adequately. even though i think if the government asked for it, we would get that kind of backing. >> if we would try to put a constraint on flights going in, that could actually impact the very help that the place needs. you have a question? >> i'm even wondering, there's such a huge amount of bureaucratic wrangling. i wonder if the w.h.o. and the cdc had all the money in the world. we're hearing stories of crates of medical supplies that remain on the docks in west africa. we're sending things over. can you explain why that is?
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>> i can explain none of these systems works well in these countries. and everybody is scrambling to catch up. and there's no excuse for it. there really is no excuse for it. >> what can be done? i guess that's the question. we hear from the cdc that they're going to stop it in its tracks. >> they're saying they can stop it here. they're not saying they can stop it there. >> how much longer can this go on? it will be six months, a year? >> by the way, if we -- dr. sachs, if we don't stop it there, do you not agree with dr. brantly who testified last week that we're kidding ourselves to believe that the atlantic ocean is going to stop ebola from coming here. if we don't act more gue aggressively to stop it in wet africa. >> we surely should be stopping it in west africa for the sake of africans and to stop the spread, period. so of course it makes no sense. and it is possible to stop this epidemic. it is a matter of basic systems
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to be put in place very, very quickly. and they could be put in place quickly. and it's not really understandable why they're not being put in place. >> when we talk about that, the infrastructure we depend on in our country and what we depend on with the cdc is not the expectation we should have from these western african countries. why supplies are sitting there remaining undelivered is a head scratcher to a lot of us. that's a case, by the way, just specifically where some individual mobilized -- mobilized a container and sent it. that's not a system response. that was an -- it's no excuse for it sitting at the port. but there aren't systems that are adequate. i'm dealing with these governments right now. they're completely overwhelmed. even the u.s. military that's gone over there, it seems i'm not completely up to date day by day. they're basically still building the first facility.
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they're not getting ahead of this epidemic. so we need a more systemic scaled emergency response. the money is there. we should be sending transport planes with the -- all of the equipment that's needed, the protective gear that's needed. the pcr machines for diagnostics. >> whose feet is this falling on, not being more reactive? >> right now, nobody reacted really at scale until september. and now there's kind of scrambling between the u.s. government, which includes cdc -- >> do you feel like the president gets it? is the president adequately engaged for your -- >> yes, for -- >> as far as your -- >> for a president dealing with 1,000 issues, he's more engaged than you would expect from many presidents. there, i was with him at a meeting with the u.n. last week where he spoke eloquently and passionately that we have to
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respond. i don't understand though. i have to say why certain basic things aren't being done. a massive flow of protective gear, of systemic training. i know because i'm a part of -- part of it. i'm not seeing the response that i would expect to see. >> it's crazy. >> it is crazy. we're trying to figure out where the levers are and the buttons are to move. i'm sending a team this week to guinea to help on the information systems, to help on the stockpiling. i know that they're intent on doing things but they're overwhelmed right now. it's very hard to understand why there isn't a larger -- it's an airlift kind of response. >> it is an airlift. we're talking about west african countries. i remember even during katrina. i remember being in cities that were affected and you would go
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out to the suburbs and the red cross would stockpile all of these supplies while people were walking around five miles away in the cities living in deplorable situations. that's in america. >> joe, one thick that's important is the focus on really controlling the response to the epidemic which is controllable, but not isolate these countries to the point of completely breaking them. >> right. >> we're watching -- this is an nbc news freelance cameraman who is being delivered -- he has ebola -- to omaha now. he has just walked off the specially prepared plane and gotten on to a stretcher and is being brought to the hospital. there are two workers that are completely dressed in medical gear that protects them from coming even close to touching him. and he's being wheeled into the ambulance and we will follow this story as his progress proceeds. the other gentleman in texas who
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came to this country from liberia and has ebola is in very critical condition. and not doing well. as you can see in this case, this patient could walk off the plane. hopeful signs. and his parents and his family and his girlfriend are waiting for word that he has been transported to the hospital. we will keep you posted on this. jeffrey sachs, thank you so much. stay with us if you can. up next, breaking up isn't hard to do in silicon valley. we'll tell you the latest tech company heading for a big split. how one company cashed in on millions thanks to an insider trading scheme and the billionaire who got entangled in one of the biggest financial scandals in history. more "morning joe" is next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches?
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welcome back. joining us now for business before the bell, cnbc's brian sullivan. want to start with the jobs report? >> it's been described as goldilocks. i know it was out on friday. the market had a huge day on friday. so we're really setting up for what some people are saying could be the perfect job -- i don't want to say the perfect economy, but the perfect job economy in a sense where it was good, it was better than expected. we're starting to see some longer working hours. that should ultimately translate into higher pay. eventually, your employer can only squeeze so much productivity out of you before having to pay you to stick around or hire somebody else. it wasn't so hot that the federal reserve might have to come in and say, maybe we need to raise interest rates sooner than expected. the economy is getting too hot. that's why we saw the big day on friday. we have to wait and see whether or not that continues. as you've been hitting on, there's so many other stories to focus on. hong kong's out there.
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ebola's even out there. this enterovirus which is getting no attention at all. >> we're very worried about that. i am for my own reasons as a dad. let's talk also about gas prices. we may actually see a drop in gas prices moving forward into the fall. >> it's great news actually because this is really a tax on everybody. it's very regressive. the lower your income, you pay the same amount of money for a gallon of gas. go new jersey. it's the only thing we're cheapest in the country for. there's a number of cities now where it's less than $3. this is just money right back into your pocket. look at that headline. there you go. may dip. hey, get in the time, boston hera herald. >> hoarder, brian sullivan, why don't you stay with us for the next segment. the staff writer who writes in the new issue about the downfall of the hedge fund, sec capital advisers. patrick sets the scene with a conference in 2008 where two
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pharmaceutical companies representing the lukewarm findings of an alzheimer's drug. he write, in the eight days proceeding the conference, he had liquidated his $700 million position in the two companies and then proceed to short the stock, to bet against they, making a $275 million profit. in a week, cohen had reversed his position by nearly $1 billion. the details of the clinical trials had been a closely guarded secret. yet sac had brilliantly anticipated them. cohen had suggested that his decisions about stocks are governed largely by gut. but federal authorities had a different speculation. that was, patrick? >> the -- what happened is the sec basically flagged these trades and started looking into them, trying to find a connection between somebody at sac capital and somebody at one of these pharmaceutical companies. they found a doctor who had been
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communicating with a young portfolio manager who worked with steve cohen. this led to the conviction. >> what's the status of steven cohen right now? >> he is not charged with any crime personally. his fund has been rechristened. >> paid a huge multimillion fine? >> a huge fine. they pled guilty to criminal charges against the firm but not against him personally. there's still an sec for failure to supervise against him. saying he may not have traded on insider trading himself, but he didn't supervise employees. >> he's still in the game, he's still one of the big players, right? >> very much. >> so portfolio he handled now is -- >> this is the thing. in the agreement with the federal, they say, we'll no locker invest outside money, we'll just invest steve's money, which is $9 billion. so they're doing okay. >> he's got a day time job, he's
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doing all right. >> how much are you covering this? >> we've covered it a lot. even with all the big personality hedge fund managers out there, steven cohen was difference. steven cohen famous for a few things. hated noise. he removed all the fans from the computers. absolute silence on the trading floor. everyone sat in a circle. he kept it at 60 degrees so you had to wear a jacket. if he didn't like what you were doing, he basically yelled at you. he could run in, close the door and i guess live there for a week or something. this is a guy famous for putting a hockey rink into his greenwich connecticut mansion. he's got one of the biggest art collections in the world. his firm, by the way, still has a couple billion of his own money, so he's not struggling. steven cohen's doing fine. >> sounds normal to me, $9 billion. so he paid a lot. but, you know what, all in all, the price for whatever he was
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doing seemed to pay off, right? >> he's out of the woods. the other thing about sac, there was this policy called down and out. if you're a young person would goeses in and works for him, it goes one of two ways it you do really well, you make money, in which case, you'll become rich. or if you lose money, you're fired, you're out. it's really -- >> sounds like a great working environment. >> i like it. >> thomas? >> i'm just thinking the arrogance of being able to shift around $1 billion and think that's not going to cause -- >> as if nobody would notice. >> you know, and this poor doctor. was in his 80s. was basically badgered over and over again. he finally kind of caved in under the pressure. nobody wants to be badgered. now had to resign in des grace. after a lock career at michigan. >> the new issue of "the new yorker." fantastic. coming up, she may have scattered the glass ceiling when they became the director of the secret service but at what cost.
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some reports indicate she was hired for the optics. she was a woman and that was the reason first and foremost, let alone her qualifications. they needed a woman to change the culture. maur read writes this, it is true women often get top jobs after the institutions have lost their luster. in pierson's case, she earned her abrupt exit. it's no blot on the copy book of women. she helped paper over fiascos at an agency where mismanagement and denial put the president's life and his family's lives in jeopardy. pierson shad eshattered the gla ceiling, but she also helped shatter the concept of an invulnerable guard. there was talk about gender in this story all along and whether or not it played a role in her choosing. >> that's right. i think it's important to talk about the glass cliff, this idea that maureen dowd brings up.
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studies have shown in struggling companies, it's women and minorities who are most likely to be promoted to chief executive. we don't know why that is. i think there's a question of whether these people feel other opportunities will come to them down the line. whereas maybe white men feel, i'll have plenty of opportunities, i can turn down this one. whereas someone like pierson may have felt she needed to step into that space because she wouldn't have gotten the opportunity otherwise. >> wasn't she hired to tone down some of the behavior happening for the secret service as they were taking their out of the country road trips and this was supposed to give the appearance that mama was in charge maybe and was going to give a better structural road trip mandate for how things were going to be happening on the road. and now we learn that there were some other things going on behind the scenes and there were some bigger security issues. >> talk about the culture. and when you change the culture in an organization, i often
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think it doesn't help necessarily to bring someone from within the culture up. we have no idea if any of these were the reasons for all the debacles we've seen. bringing in someone who has completely different experience and maybe doesn't even fit the job is something that i think wasn't considered here. >> wasn't considered. elise, certainly the one interesting thing that came out of this is you had bipartisanship on capitol hill. you look at those hearings and thought, there's one thing both sides can agree on. >> i think problems with the secret service were pervasive. there was nothing she could have done, although clearly she failed as a manager.
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because it's milk without the lactose. and it tastes? it's real milk! come on, would i lie about this? lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort. and try lactaid® supplements with your first bite to dig in to all your dairy favorites. welcome back to "morning joe." it's time to talk with what we learned today. mika, you're going to see fleetwood mack tonight. >> i am. i can't believe it. they're back. they're back. that's exciting. taking jim and his friends. what did you learn today? >> just more off the piece thinking about julia pierson, how we consider the secret service to be such a high standard, such a high bar. such apex human beings.
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there are fallibilities. >> i'm wondering how long the ebola outbreak is going to last. really, i think it could go on for another year. >> i'm going to go on to a lighter note. and say my dance worked. look, there's you and me, thomas and joe. >> well, i'm over there, i am not involved and i'm not involved because, you know what, i'm going to come up with the royals dance and the cardinals dance and we're going to see how that goes. >> we'll do it friday. that's the next time they play, right? >> they are, yeah. >> the royals will be in baltimore. you guys, if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around. we have luke russert straight ahead. breaking news this hour, the latest ebola patient arrives in nebraska for treatment. we're live on the scene for the latest on his condition and the fight to stop the spread of the virus.
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meantime, a major isis advance that could radically change control of the conflict. we'll have an in depth look on how exactly the terror group raises its funds. plus new being shoulding poll numbers for sitting senator, just 29 days left. and iowa grabbing all the attention on iowa. good morning from washington. i'm luke russert. it's monday, october 6th, 2014. the breaking news in the ebola outbreak. the fifth american infected with ebola has just arrived for treatment. just moments ago, the ambulance carrying nbc freelance photographer ashoka mukpo arr e arrived at nebraska's bio containment unit. mukpo landed at omaha's eply field half an hour ago in a specialized medevac jet from west africa. his plane steered clear the main terminal and stopped in a remote part of the or

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